The Art of Coaching “Talk of the Town”


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier April 30, 2015

 

It was fourth down and six, and the bigger, somewhat older (and probably illegal) team was pressing in. With the tension mounting, the long snapper over-snapped the punter and the ball bounced out of the end zone, giving the opponents two points — a safety.

The offensive players were in shock. This was the first time that they had been scored upon in the entire season. At halftime the score was 2-0, and the coach made a speech that no one on the team would ever forget.

The coach encouraged the players to figuratively tie themselves together in a knot so they could not be penetrated and scored on again. It was a motivating speech, but not just because of the metaphor. The players were motivated because the coach believed in them, and they believed in the coach — and each other. The team had a history and trust that was built on teamwork.

If you have ever coached, you know that it’s a tremendously rewarding job. Coaches get a front-row seat to watch their athletes compete and mature. They invest their time and resources into developing people and seeing them grow.

Of course, coaching is also a difficult job — especially when coaches are exposed to public scrutiny … and when their merit is judged by wins and losses.

What makes a good coach, anyway? Winning? Sure. If we’re talking about the Chicago Bears or the Vikings, it’s all about the Ws. But in our children’s world — be it little league, travel or high school — having an encouraging coach with a balanced perspective makes all the difference.

Everyone has seen a coach who just didn’t get it — one who used negative or discouraging comments to “motivate.” That might work with an adult athlete who becomes determined to prove his coach wrong, but it doesn’t work with younger athletes. Encouragement is the building block for confidence in young athletes.

Good coaches inspire their athletes to believe in themselves and to push to higher limits. They look kids in the eyes and get on their level while earning their respect. Good coaches take the time to explain and teach fundamentals while keeping the game fun. After all, aren’t sports and games supposed to be fun?

When I coach youth sports, I always adhere to three rules: fun, fun and fun. As the leader and chief architect of the kids’ experience, the coach should always make games and practices fun. One of a youth coach’s primary goals is to make the sport so attractive that the kids sign up again next year. They should try to take the stress out of the game by letting the kids play and not micromanaging their every move.

For some coaches, this is easier said than done. On every team there are different levels of maturity and skills, and it’s easy to get caught up in winning and playing the best kids.

Thankfully, most leagues have an equal playing time rule. But when there isn’t one, coaches should have a game plan for managing kids who are “daisy picking” and not engaged in the games. Should that plan involve mockery or aggressive chastising? Absolutely not. A coach should be overly encouraging to these kids, making them feel like part of the team. Some coaches have a negative tone and don’t encourage, instead constantly pointing out the errors. But those coaches entirely miss the point.

What are some other important parts of youth coaching? As crazy as it might sound, I could write an entire section on the snacks! I’ve seen kids crying at the end of a game as they watched the other team devouring their snacks while our kiddos looked for theirs in vain. And communication is also vital, as parents need consistent communication about schedules and events. That’s a matter of respect, and it goes a long way.

My father coached almost all of my sport teams when I was growing up. He and a few parents started a youth football league that began as a small operation with a few teams and a nicely groomed football field, but ended up as two separate locations with one field showcasing the travel teams at night under the lights.

I learned a lot of valuable lessons on that team — lessons from the coach that I never forgot. The last three years, we were undefeated. One year we were never scored on at all. And one year, we were scored on just once … two solitary points, given up in a safety.

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

#ClarendonHillsRocks

The very beginning of my understanding of sports - Colts Circa 1970

The very beginning of my understanding of sports – Colts Circa 1970

The "Good Game!" hand shake

The “Good Game!” hand shake

The almighty snack!

The almighty snack!

A Young Viking

A Young Viking!

The Minutemen - 2 points scored by KDI

The Minutemen – 2 points scored by KDI

My brother Chris 62 (the Long Snapper!).

My brother Chris 62 (the Long Snapper!).

You need to look the part

You need to look the part

Dad, always the coach

Dad, always the coach

The oldest and guinea pig

The oldest and guinea pig

Girls - The cheer!

Girls – The cheer!

 

Coach McCurry

Coach McCurry May 2015

 

Team McCurry

Team McCurry

 

An Election Poem – “Talk of the Town”


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier April 16, 2015

 

An Election Poem

Looking back on our town’s recent election,

I present this review (and some wry indiscretion).

 

There were candidates, a caucus, the park district too,

And poll-watchers who stuck to the judges like glue.

Candidates’ friends and families gave money and time,

While parents and children jammed in the yard signs.

 

There were too many signs at one business in town,

Which caused a big stink until they were torn down.

Thankfully, it worked out in a civil way,

With Starbucks coffee and level heads saving the day.

 

There were signs throughout town — some were red, white and blue,

And one with a picture just like you-know-who’s!

While some signs were allegedly stolen at night,

We’ll never really know; no one was caught onsite.

 

There were “My” and “Voice of” and “Saving” and “C4,”

And those robocalls! (Stop! We can’t take any more!)

Accusations about prostitutes; hacked email treasures;

And a store’s rumored name-changing to “Divine Pleasures.”

But the volunteer townspeople didn’t get alarmed;

They maintained our friendly village’s small-town charm.

 

The Hinsdalean and Courier held candidate nights,

Giving even the veterans sweaty palms and frights.

They sure helped the public to forge an opinion;

While the blogs fought to maintain internet dominion.

 

The newspapers helped out in stirring the pot,

And political ads also thickened the plot!

There were days when the voting junk mail hit high gear,

And I laughed when that tall building pasted together did reappear,

“The town is going to the birds,” I’m sure it did say…

If I didn’t vote rightly, they would have their way.

 

There were three CH residents running for the school board:

An incumbent, a blogger, and a mother of four.

That last one sure seemed like a good bet to me;

She’s a smart former teacher, (and her name’s McCurry!)

 

Guess they ran out of reasons not to re-elect Marty;

Though they tried to evict him, he stayed at the party.

 

The high school candidates had the most signs on the streets;

There was no way this year that they would take defeat.

There was contentious battling to even the score,

But the voters spoke loudly. Their votes cried, “No More!”

 

The election is over. Enough is enough.

Let’s forget the campaigning and accomplish some stuff!

No more knocking on doors, no more emails or calling.

No more train station loitering, hand-shaking or groveling.

 

The votes are all counted. I’ve run out of rhymes.

Good luck to the candidates … this is your time!

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

#ClarendonHillsRocks

Below are some of the images (many are hilarious!) from the recent election that took place on April 7, 2015

Many got taken down and the three remained

Many got taken down and the three remained

Saving Clarendon Hills...Amazing Grace Bookstore?

Saving Clarendon Hills

Saving Clarendon Hills...Amazing Grace Bookstore?

Saving Clarendon Hills

This was really sent out but it's still hard to believe!  Says: "champion of illegal aliens, prostitutes and convicted felons". I guess you can say anything you want in an election!  Wow!!

This was really sent out but it’s still hard to believe! Says: “champion of illegal aliens, prostitutes and convicted felons”. I guess you can say anything you want in an election! Wow!!

Saving Clarendon Hills...Amazing Grace Bookstore?

"Condo Hills"

“Condo Hills”

The C4CH sample ballot without the write in or D181

The C4CH sample ballot without the write in or D181

A column explaining why the "Hold D181 Accountable" Blog is good

A column explaining why the “Hold D181 Accountable” Blog is good

Hinsdalean endorses the candidates!

Hinsdalean endorses the candidates!

 

"Though they tried to evict him, he stayed at the party." Interesting that someone was called out as not being a team player but they made a sign without Marty's name on it.

“Though they tried to evict him, he stayed at the party.” Interesting that someone was called out as not being a team player but they made a sign without Marty’s name on it.

 

Some nice children jamming  in a sign

Some nice children jamming in a sign

And one with a picture (with a sign) just like you-know-who’s!

And one with a picture (with a sign) just like you-know-who’s!

Mike McCurry’s Real Estate Column in the Willowbrook Post


From Mike McCurry’s Real Estate Column in the Willowbrook Post April 3, 2015

Incorporated in 1960, Willowbrook has always been a fantastic place to live. But these days, it seems that things just keep getting better. First there was the Willowbrook Town Center, with its plethora of restaurants, stores and shops. Then, February saw the christening of a new Village Hall. A newly expanded police station is in the works, and there is even a community center on the horizon! The old Kmart site being developed for Pete’s Fresh Market is just another positive confirmation that businesses want to be in Willowbrook. One thing’s for sure: there’s a lot of change and excitement happening in this town!

Of course, this isn’t just good news for current residents. These new developments are encouraging homebuyers to consider Willowbrook as well. Consumers purchase homes based on location and proximity to major transportation routes and because of the excellent schools, and Willowbrook has all of these traits in spades. And even more homes are selling now because of Willowbrook’s vitality and its ability to transform and repurpose its vital assets into the necessary conveniences that consumers demand. Thanks to this rich environment, the outlook for home values is on the rise and very positive.

Impressive stats

But don’t take my word for it; the statistics speak for themselves. There were 83 homes sold within the last 12 months, and there are 70 single-family homes currently on the market in Willowbrook. Of those 70 properties, over 20 percent (15 homes) are under contract from buyers! One might deduce that if the current market is anything like the past, the inventory will be rotating at a pretty good pace. A further look at the data shows that a bulk of the homes (15) sold between $600,000 and $700,000, and there were four properties that sold between $1 million and $3 million! (I know because your humble author represented three of the parties in those transactions!)

As for the condo and townhome market, there are 83 properties currently on the market, and of those, 30 are under contract (36 percent). 183 of those types of properties sold within the last 12 months. These are signs of a very healthy multi-family market. We are seeing many baby boomers downsizing from neighboring villages and choosing Willowbrook as a great place to live. And that’s good news for you; this demographic increases the number of daytime dwellers who shop, volunteer and bring their gifts and valuable talents to the community. This is a win-win for all!

With all of the exciting new developments around town, it’s no surprise that the real estate outlook is very positive. From single-family homes to townhomes to condos, I’m thrilled to be able to play an important part of that growth. Whether you’re a long-time resident or are checking out this well-guarded secret for the first time, I look forward to helping you make Willowbrook a place you’re proud to call home.

Mike McCurry is a local realtor who has been practicing real estate full-time for over 25 years. He is consistently a top producer in the area and currently ranks #8 out of over 6,000 agents in DuPage County.  His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

Willowbrook

Reflecting on a year of Columns – “Talk of the Town”


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier April 2, 2015

Looking Back

By now, many of you will be in full vacation mode, enjoying the warmth of the sun someplace down south while this paper is resting on the porch under a soft blanket of snow. Since it will be nice and soggy when you return (and likely find its way to the recycling bin), I thought it would be a great time to reflect on the past year of my “Talk of the Town” column.

I began writing this column just over a year ago, starting with the first issue of the paper on March 6, 2014. It was an exciting beginning for everyone. No one knew what to call the paper: “Courier,” or “Clarendon Hills Courier,” or just “That Paper”! A lot of people were surprised that anyone would start a new paper, especially since many larger organizations were folding or morphing into online versions. But the editor and owner, Mike Ellis (a young but very capable man) and I met and discussed some of the topics that our readers might find interesting. From that conversation, I composed a mission statement:

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princesses & Indian Guides dad; a coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker. Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around Clarendon Hills. They sometimes have a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings. He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting Clarendon Hills residents and even a little about Clarendon Hills history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town.”

So far, there have been 27 columns — over 16,000 words written! My columns usually begin with a story. My wife doesn’t always like my stories because she can’t tell exactly where they’re going. As a reader, she is afraid that she might be taken on a journey to somewhere unknown … both to her and to me!

One of the first columns I wrote was about a book I inherited for my office from my wife’s grandfather. It’s a plat book of DuPage county from 1900 that included a bibliography and pictorial of what were then famous buildings and people. It was fascinating to me that, historically, many of the street names in Clarendon Hills were changed. For example, Ridge was Bridge, and Western was where Bridge was supposed to be. A brief look back at our history shows that many of the original developers of the land now have streets named after them, which is a nice memorial to their pioneer efforts. I love a quote that was picked up about Clarendon Hills, paraphrased here: “Only men of steady habits must settle in this place, for the serpentine appearance of streets might prove too much for a head not evenly balanced.”

I enjoyed writing several holiday-themed columns, including a love letter to our town’s gorgeous Christmas luminarias and a history of Churchill Street’s famous halloween themed events.

Some of the stories were just for fun. “Dog in the Hood,” for instance, was about all the dogs that are regulars in the downtown district, and I had a good time composing a little adventure about some boys on a sledding hill. There have also been some more serious pieces, like “When I think of Football,” a memorial piece about legendary Hinsdale Central icon Bill Huskisson. And “A Sacrifice You Will Never Know,” published for Veteran’s Day, shared a soldier’s intimate stories of the battlefield in Vietnam. It was also special to write personality profiles on Mary Brown and Krista Tally, two local luminaries everyone ought to know.

One of my favorite columns was actually written by my son Noah. Yes, that’s right — my 8-year-old son! One morning I noticed that he was writing fiction stories our new Mac. My interest piqued, I asked if he would like to put together a few topics to write about. He jumped on my lap and began plucking away at the keyboard. Before we knew it, he had an outline, then some content and then the final draft of a story about a day in the life of Noah. It was the most meaningful column that I had been a part of because Noah grew the confidence needed to write a story. His column was published!

All of my columns can be seen on my WordPress blog, where I often build out additional content and supporting pictures. (If you’d like to check it out, Google knows where it is!) It was exhilarating to see that my most recent piece, “Cyberbullying for Adults,” was read by over 3,500 visitors! Maybe you were one of them?

Life happens in small chunks of time, and one day you wake up and realize that you have grown. I have never been formally trained in writing, so it was likely noticeable to some of you that over time, I began to find my own voice and style. I learned to better communicate with my audience. There’s a comfort in telling stories to get my point across, and observing the goings-on in our town — meeting people, researching history, and walking alongside my fellow residents — has become one of my favorite parts of my week.

Thanks for letting me write about the Talk of the Town. I hope it has been as rewarding for you as it’s been for me!

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

#ClarendonHillsRocks

Atlas - Dupage County Illinois

Atlas – Dupage County Illinois

Carol and Clancy

Carol and Clancy

Bill Huskisson

Bill Huskisson

2008 Churchill Kill-de-sac 2

Mary and Don Brown

Mary and Don Brown

David E. Antrim

David E. Antrim

Abbey cutting her hair for Locks of Love

Abbey cutting her hair for Locks of Love

305 Ridge, Clarendon Hills Cub House - Fun House!

305 Ridge, Clarendon Hills
Cub House – Fun House!

Krista Talley

Krista Talley

Noah McCurry plucking away his column with his dad two Saturday's ago..

Noah McCurry plucking away his column with his dad two Saturday’s ago..

Anonymous

Anonymous

Teaching by example – A Lenten Devotional by, Mike McCurry


You can also find at Christ Church of Oak Brook’s website: http://ccob.dreamhosters.com/teaching-by-example-mike-mccurry/#more-659

I often pray over my children at night, and one of the prayers is that they will become the boy or girl that God has intended them to be — that they live the lives he has in mind for them. This blanket prayer makes me feel safe that God is in control and that he knows their God-given potential. Whatever hopes and dreams I have for them might be limited to my own mind, but God’s mind has no limits.

God certainly has high hopes for us, right? He knows how we are made, how we are wired and what great potential we have inside of us; especially since he created us in his own image. My thoughts quickly go to the hope that I am around to see these achievements in my children. I think of the old man, Simeon, to whom the Holy Spirit revealed that he would not die before he had seen the Messiah of God. My hope is that like Simeon, I can see the potential reached in my love ones before I’m gone.

One core principle that my wife, Amy, and I agreed about when we got married was that we would raise our children to know God. Our most cherished verse that we shared 15 years ago was from Deuteronomy 18, which says:

Fix these words of mine in your hearts and minds; tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Teach them to your children, talking about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Write them on the doorframes of your houses and on your gates, so that your days and the days of your children may be many in the land the Lord swore to give your ancestors, as many as the days that the heavens are above the earth.

We’ve learned over the years that the “teaching” doesn’t necessarily mean that we make our children memorize the old testament. The ways of the Lord are better learned by example. Life moves very quickly, especially when you are in the thick of raising your children. It seems like yesterday when my children grew out of the diapers stage and into the “homework every night” stage of life. With four children, from kindergarten to fifth grade, these are the years that I would like to bottle up and store as memories for a rainy day. We try so hard to teach our children in the morning and at bedtime and in between. But sometimes life gets a little too busy, and you just need to teach by example.

One example of this “teaching” that has been playing out recently is that Amy decided to run for a seat on our local school board. Admittedly, at first I didn’t buy into the idea. This seemed to be such a huge endeavor to take on, especially while juggling children’s schedules and also working 20 hours, part-time, for the school district. But the message Amy heard from the pulpit and the Holy Spirit was loud and clear: she needed to quit her job so that she could be more effective as a volunteer. The school is an institution that she grew up in, taught in, and wholeheartedly believes in the value of giving to and raising our children in. The recent sermon series from Dr. Dan Meyer about power and how it should be used for good, not for personal gain — including the recent sermon about institutions — spoke such a clear affirmation to her about her desire to volunteer.

What I have been noticing mostly throughout her campaign is that Amy is finding her own voice. Her opinions and ideas came from within her … a drive … a destiny, maybe. She is becoming who she is supposed to be. I’m watching her become who God has intended her to be and I’m happy to be cheering her along. Our children are watching, too, and my prayer for them is that as they watch, they would write the word of God on their hearts and minds.

http://ccob.dreamhosters.com/teaching-by-example-mike-mccurry/#more-659

Cyberbullying for Adults “Talk of the Town”


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier March 19, 2015

Last year, I attended a seminar on bullying at Prospect Elementary School. The Clarendon Hills police department paid for the program, in which Officer Bean educated parents on safety measures to protect our children from cyberbullying.

Of course, it’s no secret that bullying is a pervasive problem in our schools today. Usually it starts with one child — a ringleader who has some petty issue with the victim or maybe is just plain bored. This person encourages other children to jump in on the fun, and before long “the fun” has become a very unfair fight for the person being bullied.

Today’s technology adds a whole new element to the phenomenon. Thanks to social media, what would have been a single, isolated incident can spread through a school like wildfire blowing through a forest. When the Internet is involved, a child can be transformed from a classmate to an outcast in a single day. This is the incredible destructive power of cyberbullying.

Sadly, I saw that phenomenon in action recently when my wife, Amy, began running for our local school board. I initially Googled her name to see if her website was being picked up by the search engine. But to my surprise, I found some negative comments posted about her — and me — on a parent-run blog.

Some of the blog’s posts and comments seemed sincere, informed and productive … but many of them weren’t. In fact, many of them were unfounded, vicious attacks on her character, experience and intelligence. A few of them were even wild accusations and conspiracy theories about my affiliation with The Hinsdalean.

One thing that most of the vitriolic posts had in common was the author — or so it would seem. While the various comments had been written by different people, most of the hurtful ones all shared the same byline: “Anonymous.”

What is the motivation for posting an anonymous comment? Well, in some countries, the anonymity of the Internet protects human rights activists from tyrannical regimes or violent terrorists. In others, posting as Anonymous protects the posters from severe punishments imposed upon those who use government-prohibited sites.

Somehow, I don’t think those descriptions apply to our our affluent suburban school district, do you?

What’s in a name? A signature? A byline? In my world, signing your name to something means you stand behind it. It means you approve, without reservation, of the message you’re sending. It means that you’re willing to be held personally responsible for the information you’re providing … that the words you’ve written are something you can be proud of, regardless of who reads them.

If that’s the case, what does it mean to be anonymous?

There are those in our community who say, “Anything’s fair game when we’re fighting for our children’s education.” But I would remind those people — those fellow parents — that our children’s education begins with us. They watch us, they learn from us, they mimic our behavior. And often, they turn out just like us … for better or for worse.

Shouldn’t we teach our children to debate important issues without hiding behind the mask of Internet anonymity? Shouldn’t we teach them to show respect to everyone — including those with whom they disagree? Open, honest debates teach our children to be individual learners and critical thinkers. Respectful, candid discussions (online, in print or in person) teach them to hold themselves accountable, producing and sharing ideas they can be proud to attach their names to.

But what about those children who, having been taught better, continue to share only vitriol? What about those whose contributions are so vicious and/or inaccurate that they can only be shared when nobody knows who shared them?

Well, even my eleven-year-old knows what to call those kids. (It begins with the letter B.)

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

Anonymous

Anonymous

The Digital Age

Guest Columnist: Noah McCurry “Talk of the Town”


Noah McCurry with the infamous "Mask". Plucking away his column with his dad.

Noah McCurry with the infamous “Mask”. Plucking away at his column with his dad two Saturday’s ago.

From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier March 5, 2015

A Day in the Life of Noah McCurry

Getting out of bed on your own is not easy. Well … not until mom comes in the room (and yells) because you have no choice but to skedaddle and get to the breakfast table to start the day. From there, getting ready for school and taking showers is not easy with three other siblings.

Oh, by the way: I’m Noah McCurry, and this is my day.

I usually like to walk to school in the morning so I can be on time. But it has just been too cold! If my hair was wet, it would freeze! So lately, my dad has been driving us to school. Before we leave the house, though, we usually read a page from a book called “Jesus Calling.” It’s a devotional book that has messages for each day of the year. It’s always a rush to get out the door in the morning, so we are not usually on time.

One of the first people that I see when going into school is Mrs. Martin, the school’s secretary. You see, she is the person who hands out the late passes! If you are lucky (because it’s really cold outside), the late bell really doesn’t mean that you are late.

On a great day (and if I’m on time) I see my friend Pietro, who is usually at the front of the line outside. He lets me jump in line with him. No one seems to mind because they know that we are friends. My teacher, Mrs. Perkowski, is awesome! My older brother and sister have already had her as their teacher and I hope my younger sister gets to have her too!

At lunchtime I sit with my friends, Jackson, Alex and another Alex. We like to talk about sports. Mondays are a little different, though, because I go to Spanish class and eat there. There are some adults who are in the lunchroom with us: Mrs. Zickert and Miss Johnson. They are always nice to us, even when we are acting crazy! Before I could read really well in school, they would help me read the notes my mom puts in my lunch. Now that I can read, they sometimes still want to read my notes. I think they like to see what she’s telling me.

On Fridays, we get to hear about the life of one of my classmates. It’s an interesting morning each week when one lucky student shares about his or her life. They bring lots of pictures, their trophies and even their parents. Afterwards, we slip out our laptops and type encouraging letters to the person who did the sharing. I got to share my life a little while ago and it was really fun.

One of my favorite activities is practicing soccer. I get to see my friend, Sachin. He plays on my AYSO soccer team, which is called the Green Ninjas. At practice, we do scrimmages and drills so that I can get to be a better player. I love to play soccer!

My Papa and Nonnie (Grandma and Grandpa) brought home a mask from Mexico for me. I sometimes like to wear it at home to pretend that I’m an animal running through the house on hands and feet, like a cat chasing string. The real reason I like to wear it is because I can scare people or make them laugh.

One of my favorite things to do is to go on vacation with my family. We usually go to Florida for winter break. When we drive down, it is our tradition to stop at a Waffle House to celebrate my birthday. The people there are very nice and one year we all got hats signed by the people that work there. The drive is long but getting there makes up for it. My mom gets all stressed out because my dad does not find a house until we pull into town. He likes to do that because that’s kind of his job. The best part of being on vacation is the McCurry’s don’t ever worry about being on time.
Noah is a second grade student and one of four children in the McCurry family. Noah loves playing soccer, football, basketball, paddle and climbing on just about any fixed structure. Recently he has been writing fiction. Most of all, Noah loves to encourage people and make them laugh.

Noah McCurry plucking away his column with his dad two Saturday's ago..

Noah McCurry plucking away his column with his dad two Saturday’s ago..

Noah, the Climber

Noah, the Climber

2015-01-08 15.12.07

Noah and his siblings: Elizabeth, Abigail and Micah

Noah and his siblings: Elizabeth, Abigail and Micah

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