Evolution of the Family Portrait


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, July 6, 2017

Our children always turn to the page with the limousine, where their mom and I are posing for our honeymoon getaway. Another favorite of my daughters’ is the portrait of with Amy (my wife) in the classic, solo pose, displaying her beautiful dress and veil. Our wedding album is proudly displayed on a table in our family room, and they often like to flip through the pages to see the pictures of our former selves.

In a 1789 letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy, Benjamin Franklin wrote, “Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

We all know about the death and taxes idiom, but the other one of life’s certainties is that there will be change.

Nothing shows change more than old photographs.

About once a day, Facebook reminds me of my memories, adding to my page a picture of something I posted exactly one year or several years ago. Facebook encourages its users to highlight that “memory” on the present day.

It’s actually kind of fun to see what was posted from the past, and also interesting to see the changes that happen over time. Because we have children who are in their growing stages, a year time-span can produce noticeable changes. They’ve gotten taller, their faces have matured and their smiles have changed.

Every so often, Facebook also reminds me of a picture from the hospital room after a child was born—those are fun to see.

Even with all the pictures posted on social media, people are still hanging family pictures on their walls to mark time and change. But the style of professional photography is not the same as it used to be.

I recently spoke with Clarendon Hills resident Jennifer Myall from Jennifer Lawrence Photography about changes in her industry.

Jennifer said that the older, posed shots are no longer in fashion. Many of her sessions are done in the home or at the family’s favorite place to be, and usually capture the moments of doing life together. She still takes the “smile and say cheese” shots, because her clients think they want them, but they’re not interested once they see their family showcased in a casual and relaxed environment.

“People love the documentary-style photography that shows off the in-between moments, because it’s real-life,” Myall said. She told me that the matching shirts and perfect family portraits don’t sell. “Who sees a two-year-old walking around in khakis and a polo anyway?” she said.

Reunions, weddings, anniversaries, milestone birthdays, graduations and high-school senior photos are still the important moments to catch on film, but it’s the day-to-day moments that we forget about, and become too common to remember. Part of my identity and also my children’s identities have been molded by images we see of ourselves and our loved ones who are now gone.

We have a few old photos of our parents and grandparents when they were young, but none of which are the documentary-style photography. It would be interesting to get a glimpse what life was really like back in their days. That would help connect the story to the picture.

I had to make that painful change recently by updating my business photos. We all get older, and nothing shows that more than an old picture of ourselves. In with the old-new me, and out with the old-young me. Change is an inevitable certainty, and it needs to be embraced.

I’m convinced that the documentary-style photography is a wonderful way to capture and remind us of the common and real moments shared with family members.

I’m also a little old-fashioned, because I love some of the posed pictures—especially the one of my beautiful bride in that wedding dress;—and she hasn’t aged or changed one bit.

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princess; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 26 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

                         This one tells a story! I just told a joke to my father in law.

 

                                        My dad and David Antrim (my father in law)

Schools Out! Summer music begins!


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, June 8, 2017

Alice Cooper’s “Schools out classic turned 45 last month. It wasn’t the first teen anthem marking the end of the school-year and the beginning of summer, but it certainly added the exclamation point. Believe it or not, even this song was a little before my time (or at least when I graduated). My summer was filled with tunes from Chicago band Styx’s “The best of Times,” Kool and the Gang’s “Celebration” and Devo’s “Whip it”. There’s something about music that marks time and brings people together – whether it’s an anthem or a song of celebration, music is such a powerful social glue.

With the schools out for summer, the pressure to keep the schedule from exploding seems to be an impossible task. I know at my house, we have plenty of conflicts during which multiple car pools could be running at the same time. So, before you fill your calendar up in red ink, keep some dates open for the best gifts our town has in store for you – especially when it comes to music.

Daisy Days kicks off Father’s Day weekend on Friday night, June 16th. Known for the family-friendly carnival rides, the Clarendon Hills Chamber of Commerce puts on a tremendous weekend filled with rides, food and music for its residence. The music that we have lined up is fantastic.

The band New Odyssey (3 guys, 30 instruments) opens on Friday at 7 pm, and the country cover band, Whiskey & Harmony plays on Saturday night at 7 pm.

The very popular Daisy Days Idol continues this year with students from first to eighth grade, performing on Saturday from 1 to 2:30 pm. All of the proceeds from the registration of Daisy Days Idol go to the District 181 Foundation.

The following Wednesday, June 21st starts the beginning of Dancin’ in the Streets, a summer concert series hosted by the Village of Clarendon Hills. From 6:30 to 9:30 pm almost every Wednesday until August, the downtown (from Starbucks to the tracks) is closed, and the village comes to life with music. Families put down blankets and chairs in the street while spending their night listening to wonderful music. There is a plethora of craft beers and wines available, and each night features a different food vendor, usually local. If you are new to the village, these are evenings not to miss, so mark the dates (in red) on your calendar.

Here is the lineup for Dancin’ in the Streets:

6/21 –    Heartsfield, a veteran southern rock band with 11 albums and have toured since the 1970s.

6/28-     Scramble – a returning act, this classic rock band plays the town’s favorites (and mine)

7/12 –    Frankie B – an immensely talented local singer and song writer (actually very local – she went to Walker, CHMS and graduated from Hinsdale Central!)

7/19 –    Spoken Four – a versatile band playing everything from the 1950’s tunes to top 40’s hits.

7/26 –    Rhythm Rockets – a Jazz and Blues Swing band influenced by 1940’s and 1950’s saxophone band.

8/2 –       Libido Funk Circus – another town favorite that entertains does disco, and just about everything that is fun. They performed at the Clarendon hills Infant Welfare Society auxiliary chapter this past winter.

******

Let’s get together, find what we have in common, and listen to our anthems. I hope you are able to fill in the dates and come to town this summer – even if your graduation and summer begins with Justin Timberlake’s, “Can’t Stop the Feeling!”

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princess; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 26 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

The Inclusive Classroom at risk in D181


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, April 27, 2017  -Written by Amy McCurry

I strategically planned to park our car somewhere around the two-mile mark of a three-mile walk. Although involved with both “Girls on the Run” and cross country at CHMS, our daughter has a pattern of “getting stuck” in several circumstances. In this case a long walk.

If you watched or participated in last year’s Daisy Dash, you might recall watching her ditch her father (on Father’s Day) to sprint ahead and cross the finish line at the very end. Poor Mike – I think he came in dead last with only the police car trailing right behind.

~

When we’ve planned and executed a family experience, our plans that involve transitions usually don’t always work out as we’ve hoped. However, in most cases, the outcome still brings joy, and there’s always a lesson to be learned. That “teachable moment” still occurs while I am at home teaching our children, rather than in the classroom.

The love of a classroom was placed in my soul all the way back in kindergarten, when Miss Helen Weisbruch move up from kindergarten to the first grade with me. She made a foundational impact upon my view of education. Then, somewhere along the road, and due to an exposure to disability, I focused my own educational interests on special needs.

Eventually, my path lead me to teaching children with special needs at HMS and CHMS. I co-taught in all subjects and had the opportunity to model and “teach” inclusive practices to several colleagues who at the time simply didn’t “get it”. Not because they didn’t want to, they just had not yet had the opportunity to work with a special-ed teacher who valued – yes, learning, but more importantly, the love of children learning anything together. We taught content together in different ways so that all children could learn.

Low Incident (uncommon usually with more severe disabilities) children were not included in regular education. One teaching situation that continues to haunt me was when a specific student on my case-load received a majority of instruction in a small room (closet) by an instructional assistant. This was common with these kinds of learners. I knew it was wrong, but the system had not yet allowed access for some students.

This might have been a turning point of inclusion here in District 181. Even our Principal at the time, “Mr. K”, hit a personal learning curve by including children who might otherwise not have been thought to have belonged.

It was due to the efforts of open-minded teachers and the advocacy of a group of parents whose children with more severe needs were entering the scene at CHMS.

The outcome: regular education became accessible to all students.

I often reflect upon the experiences of “those families” now while raising our daughter. I promised her early on that she would never be stuck in a room isolated from other peers. At the time I truly didn’t know what it was like in “their shoes”, but for the last 12 1/2 years, I can say I do now. I now understand that all I had learned was preparing me for her life.

I knew little about raising a child with Down Syndrome, but I did know the advocacy skills I developed from teaching were going to be implemented and strengthened daily in and throughout this precious child. I knew we were called to provide her with every opportunity her siblings and friends would have; expecting the most from her and from the world; acceptance and a chance.

From the very beginning; with therapies, early childhood, Sunday school, recreation, dining out, swim lessons – we have done our best in offering her everything that all children experience. And thankfully, I had my background that would help navigate the education world.

All circumstances within a family are affected by disability, and oftentimes, the child as well as the parent feel alone.

School is that one place when your child is included; it feels normal to be there. It’s one less discrepancy. The child has an endless amount of peers, experiences and opportunities that are quite difficult to create by oneself.

We haven’t been able to organically have many “play dates”, but Abbey had typical friends who early on invited her to birthday parties, genuinely interacted in group learning, and connected with her on the playground.

Today at CHMS she sits at lunch with friends from other feeder schools, raises her hand and contributes in classes like science and language arts, has done PowerPoint presentations, participates in after-school activities, while transitioning through all subjects on any typical day. She even beats her brother to the bus that takes her to and from her home school.

To know that the small steps and big efforts all those years ago had evolved into the reality of my daughter completely included in all classes has been a dream come true.

I thank the efforts of those before us, and to the incredible teachers who believe in her abilities and potential. I’m in awe when think about the path I’ve followed to see the fruits of inclusion not only benefit our Abbey, but so many others; both with and without disability.

This community is inclusive because our schools have been.

The classrooms in my children’s schools have taught children empathy, acceptance, love and true friendship by letting the lives of those with special needs touch the “typical” child. Someone said to me yesterday, “You can’t teach this kind of kindness – it’s an experience.”

Growing close to other parents walking in shoes like mine doesn’t take long to dive deep, and share stories of significance. What I have recently learned is extremely disturbing. Disability might not have touched your life yet, but I am certain that your children have been changed by some special student they are in class with.

So, this message is important to all of you in our community.

Unfortunately, the educational placements of those “low incident” students are, once again, being threatened and altered for the 2017-18 school-year. Right before our eyes and under our noses, the inclusion program is changing direction. Not only access to the general-ed curriculum being denied, but in some circumstances children will not attend their home school to “better support their needs”, because functional skills are more important than academics. Functional skill should be taught in and through general education.

I had believed that our collective efforts on behalf of our daughter would contribute to the inclusive learning environment for those to follow. The thought that an educational placement such as hers is now being called a “mistake” is disheartening.

This was the very first year we walked The Walk for Autism. The relationships my children have formed with children in school brought us to the Community House on Sunday. I was not only walking for Autism; I was walking for a community that takes the time to support those that do, and thankful for all the Community House has provided.

As Abbey walked the route with friends and neighbors, many of her teachers throughout the years walked alongside, championing her to finish.

Thank you to every single teacher who has and will continue to make a difference in the life of all students.

~

I didn’t have time to park my car a mile away from the Community House, and as it turned out I didn’t need to.

Abigail Faith crossed the finish-line, under the blue-and-white arch of balloons with her big brother and an entire inclusive community.

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princess; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 26 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

Two Homegrown Events for Earth Day


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, March 30, 2017

What is the landscape look like for you this week? A desert, a beach, white powder on a mountain side, a museum or maybe a water park?

Having children in our public schools, I know that it’s spring break for Hinsdale School District 181, and a few of our school friends are on a beach in Florida, some are on the ski slopes in Colorado and Canada. A picture of one of our friends on Facebook showed their family in the Scottsdale desert. Another picture artistically captures a Corona, with lime in the foreground and beach and feet in the background.

Meanwhile –  a freight train passed by my office in downtown Clarendon Hills today, and after several minutes the gate finally went up. A pretty typical scenario – except that there were no cars waiting to cross the tracks afterwards. It was like I was in a ghost town with a train just passing through it.

When all those lucky vacationers return to town from their fun in the sun and snow, we will have a few short weeks until our landscapes and yards here in the Midwest explode into spring, and into an uncontrollable jungle. Now is the time to seize the moment, start planning and line up your service partners for your outdoor spring landscaping projects. If you are installing a new patio or deck, or just trimming some of your trees and bushes, we all know that the landscapers get busy all at the same time.

It was a year last October when we moved from our home, just two blocks away from where we currently live. We spent a considerable amount of energy thinking and working through the landscape design of our old residence, so we wanted to give at least a full season before we embarked on any new projects for our new home. We decided to enjoy and live in the home for at least a year, and to see how we used it before changing anything. For us, entertaining guest is important, and because the home came complete with a pool, there was a lot to think about as far as a landscape design.

And because I love anything to do with landscape design –  especially the progress that comes with it -, we hired a talented and artistic landscape architect to present ideas that we could implement in time. We are now in the middle of that planning, and are almost ready to move forward with some projects. We can’t do it all on our own, and because I know that my service partners are going to be busy, I’m getting on their schedule now – and so should you!

Speaking of planning – The village of Clarendon Hills has been planning the groundbreaking celebration for the Richmond Education Gardens and Apiary, which will be held at 10 am to noon on Saturday, April 22.

Located just West of the police station and public works facility is a space owned by the villages of Westmont and Clarendon Hills. The gardens are designed to educate our community about our environment and natural and organic gardening. There will be rain gardens, native vegetables, wildflowers, a butterfly garden — and even a collection of beehives. This is an exciting project that will benefit our schools and our community. At the celebration, activities will include tours of the garden and apiary, story reading by The Birches, and the Clarendon Hills Public Library will supply animal balloons. To learn more about the project, go to http://www.richmond gardens.org

You might need to divide your time on April 22: The Park District of Clarendon Hills is also hosting its Earth Day event at Prospect Park Pavilion. Residents will enjoy a fun morning making crafts from recycled items, building birdhouses, planting flowers, playing some games and getting their faces painted by our friendly Park District friends!

Welcome home!

We were that family that got away for a few days at the water-park, and now it’s time to start planning, and to start digging in the dirt.

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princess; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 26 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

 

The Great Easter Egg Hunt


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, April 13, 2017

Dozens of kids lined up at the south edge of Steves Park, armed with baskets in hand, and ready to pounce on the first colored egg their little eyes could spy. The anticipation was getting the best of a few, and there were some meltdowns in the crowd. Knowing the older kids would just plow over the toddlers if they were all sent out together, the organizers of the event let loose the 5-year-pld and under group first. It was by far the largest wave of children, and marking the start of the great Easter egg hunt.

These toddlers didn’t need an adult to help locate their prize – the colorful blue, pink, orange, yellow and purple eggs were everywhere the eye could see. But most had a parent in tow to help keep the focus, and to save them from devouring all the jelly beans, chocolates and whatever morsels they could eat while on the run.

The next couple of waves set free were older; these were cognizant of the brief announcement that came from the man with the microphone. He explained there were a few golden eggs containing a fresh $50 dollar bill. The finder of these golden eggs could do whatever they desired with the money (with parental permission of course). And for these kids, that money would buy a lot more fun on their itunes account, or a new game for their Xbox. For the Walker Elementary parents who promoted the hunt, they knew how to get the older siblings running at this early hour of the morning – throw in some gold with a little green incentive!

The good news is, the Clarendon Hills Park District is hosting its’ Annual Easter Egg Hunt tomorrow – Friday, April 14 at 10:50 – in Prospect Park (not at Steves Park!). Children from 3-12 years of age are encouraged to bring a basket to hold all of the colorful eggs they collect. The park district not saying what special prizes are in the eggs just yet, but there will be something special for sure (maybe a $50 bill?)

If you are wondering where all those eggs come from, you can visit the Easter Bunny before the Egg Hunt, and ask him for yourself. He will be at a breakfast served by our Park District friends from 8:30-10AM. The famous park District face painters and tatoos artist will be there with “washable” tatoos.

Like most Easter egg hunts, the one hosted a few years ago at Steves Park was well-attended, the weather held up perfectly, and no one got ran over. The parents were brilliant to sweeten the pot with the golden eggs. Come to think of it, the pot was sweetened for the adults too – a buffet table was full of lots of food, and an abundant of garnish for the well-received brunch cocktails. What a great town we live in – it’s great to share these fun, family events with our neighbors, right in our own community.

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princess; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 26 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

Ten measures of grace for us, and for our neighbors


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, March 16, 2017

I’ve been thinking about perceptions lately, and how they are playing out between folks in Clarendon Hills and the people in the Village of Hinsdale. I’ve heard a lot of opinions over the years about the perceived differences each town has, and what they liked, or disliked about their respective villages. Some perceptions are healthy, and some are not.

With these differences, often comes competition. I’ve heard people arguing that Aguamiel is more authentic than both Cine and Casa Margarita in Hinsdale, or that Dip & Dogs has better ice cream than The Daily Scoop. (Just for the record, I think the moose tracks at Scoop is the best.) But I’ve also heard some chatter coming from Hinsdale, that there isn’t a desire to support Clarendon Hills anymore, and that bothers me.

Unfortunately, a more serious argument between our two towns has begun. A lawsuit filed on Dec. 28 by five Clarendon Hills residence against Hinsdale District 181, threatens to destroy the interwoven social, economic and educational fabric that we have enjoyed for so long. A lawsuit by people in our own town, will most likely stop the building of the middle school for Hinsdale children, at least for now.

For the record, this is not a political column, but one written out of concern about what the lawsuit looks like to our sister town. The perception is that we don’t care about the greater good of the school district, and for what is good for Hinsdale. And the reality of it is, there are five people who are perceived as representing one voice for most of Clarendon Hills.

The similarities and roots run deep interconnecting the two respective towns. It seems as there are too-many-to-count 2nd and 3rd generation Hinsdalean’s living in Clarendon Hills, and probably the same amount who grew up here, and move to our neighboring town to the east. My wife and many of her childhood friends from Hinsdale are a good example of adults who have made their homes in our community. It’s like our fabric is interwoven generationally.

The amount of friends we have in Hinsdale continue to grow, primarily because our children play sports, take classes at The Community House, or go to church and school together. There are a vast many of outlets for our two towns to connect and raise families together.

Further differences also make us unique. The biggest difference is that Hinsdale is actually bigger; it’s more than double Clarendon Hills in terms of area and population. Their downtown business district is at least four times the size of ours, and with all of their lovely specialty shops, and restaurants, they have more choices than we do. Ours is small and quaint and theirs is quaint and large.

It shouldn’t be hard to figure out where most the money for our schools comes from, and that the larger town gave multiple times aggregately in taxes to build three new schools we enjoy here in our town, and they may not get to enjoy the same.

It’s interesting that our governments work together for the good of the cause. Did you know that our fire departments, when needed, support and show up to each other’s emergency calls? At one time, they tried (unsuccessfully) to merge together. It was a great example of being willing to help each other, and save on resources.

Our schools are also a good example of sharing cost and resources with our neighbors, and I hope that we can continue to do so.

I’ve heard it said that you should give an measure of grace with everyone you know, and always give an extra ten to your neighbors. I hope that the people of Clarendon Hills will let our neighbors in Hinsdale know that we care about them, and request that extra measure for us, and for the five other voices.

“Men who look on nature, and their fellow-men, and cry that all is dark and gloomy, are in the right; but the sombre colours are reflections from their own jaundiced eyes and hearts. The real hues are delicate, and need a clearer vision.”

― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princess; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 26 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

 


A Lenten Devotional – Ashes and Dirt, and a Fresh New Focus


“Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return”.

If you have ever watched your own children kneel and receive the ashes smeared on their foreheads in a form of a cross, it’s a humbling sight. The realization of knowing that my own destiny on earth, and those who I love, are going to eventually be part of its dirt, helps me to be more centered and focused on important things. The journey of Lent began yesterday with Ash Wednesday, and will end the Thursday before Good Friday and Easter, a little over 40 days later.

For many of us, it actually began with Fat Tuesday.

Since the Lenten season is about self-denial, prayer, repentance, and aligning oneself with God’s direction, the (almost out of control) ramp up on excesses of food, drink and indulgence culminates in a need to hit the reset button. Admittedly, I oftentimes need this hard stop of life’s luxuries to help me get back into perspective with God’s plan for my life.

I not alone, am I?

I know a few people (one very close to me) who are very disciplined with their consumption habits. Their weight doesn’t fluctuate more than 2 to 3 pounds during the year. They take what they need, and leave the rest behind – on the plate.

I’m not like that.

Consuming a lot is a hard habit to break. In my earlier years, and being a former football player, I needed to consume a lot of food as part of my training. Eating a lot became almost burdensome to me. I don’t think I ate as much as Houston Texans All Pro defensive end JJ Watts, who reportedly eats between 6000 and 9000 calories a day, but I might have been close to it. Like me, it will be hard for him when he’s finished with football.

Lent is not about dieting.

But through a slowing down and examining ones consumption habits, it might expose our need to fill the empty void or a somewhat narcissistic focus on the most important and false gods in our lives: ourselves. By this time of year, I’ve usually gone off the rails, and I’m looking forward to getting back on track, and to return to God with a fresh new focus.

Maybe Lent is about second chances.

Every year, we get this season to reflect on where we’ve been, and to examine if our values and priorities actually match up to what God’s has in store for us. It’s the re-set button that we’re longing to have. Lent is a six-week journey to take the focus off of ourselves, and put the focus on the one who deserves it.

The fallacy about second chances is that we need to do work to be in God’s favor; – in reality, Christ did all the work for us on the cross. It is by grace, and through faith that we are aligned to God. The Lenten journey might be less about us, and more about realizing who He is.

So if you notice some ashes on the unwashed foreheads today, just remember, on this earth, we’re all on track for the same destiny.

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast.” Ephesians 2:8-9 NIV

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princess; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 27 years, and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514.

His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

Ashes and Dirt