A Fish Story


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, July 23, 2015.

I’ve heard it said that in the early 1970s, a huge fish was caught in the pond at Prospect Park. Locals say that it took several adults and children to pull the prehistoric monster up on shore.

I wasn’t there, of course. But the story goes that it occurred at the fishing derby put on by the Park District of Clarendon Hills. In the early years of this annual event, there were always some pretty big fish pulled out during the contest.

On this particular Saturday in late July, the children had begun casting their lines early in the morning (without much luck). But around 10 a.m., the pole of one of the children slowly began to bend over. His grandfather thought that he had caught a “tree bass” or a boot, or maybe something that was affixed to the bottom of the pond. The line was very tight, and whatever was on the other end was not responding to the tugs the child was making. The boy’s grandpa came over and tried to help, but the line seemed as though it would snap if they pulled too hard.

Soon, many of the others participating in the event began to notice the commotion and could see that the pair needed assistance. Three adults began helping the youngster, and it appeared that they were making some headway with the slow-moving mass.

Then, without warning, the peaceful day was shattered as the massive head of a fish broke through the top of the water! Three times the size of an adult human, this monster’s head looked like a catfish but had a bony and prickly face. Its body was covered with a carpet of peat moss. People were screaming with shock and awe; they had never seen such a big and ugly fish! Several brave men and women jumped into the pond to help push and pull the fish to the shore.

If you’re sensing something is a little fishy about this fish story, come check it out for yourself! This Saturday is the annual fishing derby at Prospect Park. It’s for Clarendon Hills residents and is always fun for the whole family. Grandparents, dads, moms, sons and daughters have a great time at this annual tradition of catch-and-release competition. Trophies will be given for the longest fish in age groups of eight and under, 9-12, 13-17 and adults.

I recently spoke with the always delightful Superintendent of Recreation, Kelly Smith, about the upcoming event. She said the fishing’s good; in May the Park District stocked the pond with over 150 bluegill and 45 bass. This week they put in over 400 catfish!

Of course … they never stocked the monster. Nobody knows where that prehistoric beast came from. But people say that when it woke up to find itself on shore, it was not happy with the rather smallish humans poking and prodding its imposing body. With one big whip of its tail it knocked several bystanders to the ground, and with another it flung itself into the air and leapt back into the pond. A giant wave of water crashed onshore, careening across the park and reaching as far as the future site of Clarendon Hills Middle School! (Historians note that this event later inspired the idea to flood the tennis courts for ice skating.)

That wave also crashed over the young boy holding the fishing pole. And while the smile never left that child’s face, the fish that was caught that day did leave. Some say he’s still down there in the depths, waiting for just the right bait.

Is it yours?

———————————————
In my column two weeks ago, another “fish” story was told about a terminator of sorts: the Tickenator, a fictitious but hilarious (so I thought) police officer with an insatiable desire to give tickets, stemming from the Caddy that kept him from going to the Cubs game in his youth. It was never intended to be degrading or to challenge our wonderfully dedicated police force in Clarendon Hills. My apologies if this was taken the wrong way. I should have included a disclaimer: “Only read if you have a sense of humor … it’s all in good fun.”


Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princess; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

Perhistoric Fish

The Tickenator


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, July 9, 2015.

Like a lioness lying in wait as she stalked a gazelle, he waited patiently, eyes never leaving his prey. From his vantage point behind the flower box, he could see the white Mazda SUV was still there, glistening in the sun. He checked his watch again: 3:27. Nearly there.

“Three minutes, dearie,” he thought with a grin. “Three minutes and then I’ve got you.” His heart raced as he fingered the wireless ticket generator hooked to his belt. Soon enough he would be acting out the thrilling routine: unhooking the device and withdrawing it like a laser gun from its holster. Deftly typing the license plate number and seeing the screen flicker as it registered his prey’s VIN number. Then, the delicious whir as the paper emerged from the device. He loved how the ticket number and fee were burned so boldly into its surface, a condemning record of automotive sins. Soon enough he would be strolling across the street, tearing the paper from the device and placing it with a flourish underneath the windshield wiper, exacting sweet justice —

Across Prospect, he heard a squeak as the door of Zabler Jewelers opened and a woman walked out. Eyeing her new bracelet lovingly, she didn’t seem to notice him as she reached into her purse, withdrew her keys, and — oh no — walked toward the white Mazda.

“Oh no — no, not yet!” he thought as she held her hand before her and pressed the button. The Mazda’s lights blinked and the car’s doors unlocked. He checked his watch: 3:29. “Not yet! No!””

Gripping one of the flowers in the flower box in rage, he watched as his white gazelle opened its door, roared to life … and drove away.

The Tickenator had been foiled again.

He stood to full height and his hand relaxed its grip, blue petals falling lifelessly to the ground. That was the third car this morning. How did they all know? These lazy days of summer had always evoked a sense of non-urgency … a meandering, carefree attitude that made people forget their watches and enjoy the friendly streets of the town. That blissful Clarendon Hills attitude had always suited him and his ticket generator well; it swept them right into his open hands. Easy pickings.

But not today. Today, even McCurry seemed to be on his game. Twice today the Tickenator had seen the local Realtor emerge from his office to move his car. The stripe of chalk on his tire moved again. Lately, McCurry seemed to have a preternatural knowledge of exactly when the two-hour time limit of his parking space was up.

And yet …

He checked his records. He checked his watch. 3:31. McCurry’s Cadillac Escalade truck was due to expire in one minute!

Oh, how he hated that Caddy! It always brought him right back to that terrible day. He had been just a kid then, anxiously waiting for his father to come home from work so they could head downtown to his very first Cubs game. He had been sitting by the window and watching for his dad’s return from the train station when he saw a long, gold-colored Cadillac roll to a stop … directly in front of his driveway!

The driver had gotten out, locked the door … and strolled away! Just like that! The Tickenator had banged on the window, but the man had paid no attention and was just turning the corner to the north when his father emerged from the south, rushing up the sidewalk with a spring in his step. But as he neared the house, the spring vanished. His father eyed the car with wide eyes as the reality of the situation set in. They’d never be able to get the car out now! Not without driving over his mother’s prized blue flowers, anyway. And that would never do. It appeared that the Cubs game would go on without them.

He awoke from his terrible memory to find his hand hurting. He had been squeezing it. Relaxing his grip, he opened his fingers and watched another flurry of petals fall to the ground. Seeing the blue only strengthened his resolve.

He would get that golden Caddy. It would be sweet retribution for that fateful day that had set him on course to be a parking enforcement officer. That golden Cadillac was his very purpose as the Tickenator.

He checked his watch: 3:32. Perfect, McCurry’s time was up. He writes another parking ticket, the fourth so far this year for the Realtor – got him!  It feels good but it never seems to be enough to get him to that Cubs game after all.

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

Tickerator

McCurry's Caddy

McCurry’s Caddy

RAIN THAT SEEMS TO NEVER END!


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier, June 25, 2015.

RAIN THAT SEEMS TO NEVER END!

Standing in the middle of Park Avenue, I gazed west toward the park and police station. The area looked like a war zone. At least three giant plastic playhouses were floating in several feet of water, having escaped from nearby backyards on Colfax. Some lawn furniture and kids’ toys and a lot of mulch was floating on top of the water. There were a few whirlpools violently pulling water and debris down into the street drains. These watery funnels were beyond dangerous — if you stood next to them, you might get sucked into the sewer along with the debris! Park Avenue Park (the snow hill park and detention basin) was completely underwater. The rain had come for so long and hit so hard that there was nowhere for the water to go.

Many of you will recognize this scene from the flood of April 18, 2013, when metro Chicago was devastated by storms that dumped over 8 inches of water in a couple of days. Clarendon Hills and the surrounding areas also experienced a lot of damage. The area along Richmond and Park Avenues was the epicenter of the flood, where Westmont’s water poured over the detention area as it flowed east. There were other hard-hit areas around town, but this area was the worst. As you might imagine, there was a lot of talk about it afterward … mostly about how to avoid the next one.

Lately, it seems to me that either we moved to Seattle without me noticing, or it’s been the soggiest year that I can remember since then. The grass around town is emerald green. If you have a sprinkling system installed, I hope it has a rain sensor on it!

Sadly, the Saturday night Daisy Days concert was shut down because rain pounded the downtown area — including the rides. (Well, the carnies kept the rides going until someone noticed that there was a lot of electricity feeding them!) Seeing kids on the giant slide in the pouring rain was quite a show. It’s good to be a kid and actually enjoy the rain! Most of us don’t enjoy the rain nearly as much as children do. Of course, children don’t have to worry about the status of the sump pump!

Another good thing that came from the recent rain is that it kept a lot of potentially rowdy fans inside after the Blackhawks’ Stanley Cup championship. There were tornado warnings and flash flood warnings, but that didn’t stop many Chicagoans from going to the home game and celebrating afterward.

Whenever we get a hard rain, I think back to the April 2013 downpour as a “checkpoint.” It’s a good standard to measure against. “Exactly how bad is bad?” Since then, like many people in town, I’m a little on-edge when it rains hard or for a long period time. For instance, the recent storms that we experienced brought a whopping 3-plus inches in a 24-hour period. If it had kept raining, it might have been similar to the 2013 storms.

Thankfully, this year’s rains didn’t bring the devastation of that year, when the park was littered with debris. After the water finally settled, one family came by to claim their furniture and another dragged one of the playhouses back home. The other two were left stranded in the park for awhile. I think they finally got claimed by a pickup truck on Amnesty Day.

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

The Giant Fun Slide

The Giant Fun Slide

The Little White Ball


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier May 28, 2015

The little white ball.

A Par. A Birdie. An Eagle.

Maybe even a hole-in-one.

You strive to hit the little white ball a little less. A little longer, but straighter. In the fairway, not in the woods. Out of the sand, over the water, onto the green and into the cup. It’s a game that eludes most people because it involves a little white ball, a small hitting surface and a lot of green … and sometimes, a lot of water.

Even the pros hit it in the water, and knowing that is what keeps a lot of people playing the game. I actually relish seeing the pros knock it into the water, the woods or the gallery. It makes them mortal, just like you and me. For my rounds, I pack some less expensive (often preowned) “water” balls for the difficult shots because I know the ball is destined to go in. The water is like a magnet to the ball; it wants to take a swim! It often wants to find the beach and it loves walking in the woods.

I started playing the game after college, but not with any regular consistency — maybe 6 or 10 times a summer. Last year I started playing more, going out at least once a week for most weeks in the fall. My game got a little better, but the ball kept finding the water!

Amy and I played our first round of golf together last summer. All 18 holes. I would never recommend playing front and back nine with your spouse, especially when one of you is new to the sport. By the 16th hole, we were not talking.

I think I may have said something like, “You don’t need to verbalize every little thing that’s on your mind!” She didn’t think too kindly of that comment. She wanted to hit every single shot, like it would be a sin to pick up the ball and drop where I was hitting from. Of course, some say golf is a game in which you just need to keep moving so you don’t frustrate yourself … not to mention your partner or the foursome behind you!

We started talking again sometime the next week. She was very proud of the fact that she didn’t lose a ball, like I did …  many of which went in the lake.

My family joined Ruth Lake Country Club last spring. It was a great time to get in because so many young families were joining. Many were also from Clarendon Hills. When we were interviewed by the membership committee, one of the questions they asked was, “Why do you want to join?” I think the answer kind of surprised the committee; I told them that I wasn’t interested in socializing as much we were looking for a place for my family to relax, enjoy some downtime and play sports together. The truth was, I was a little burned out on socializing. I was dreaming of enjoying holidays and our special events as a family together.

The children did play a lot of tennis, golf and paddle tennis that first summer. But what all four really enjoyed was swimming for the Ruth Lake swim team. They actually helped win the conference championship! And spending time golfing with my children, especially as they are growing up, has been a dream of mine for a long time. As they get older, they might not want to talk or spend as much time with us … but they might if it involves playing a sport together.

I’m looking forward to many years ahead, hitting that little white ball with my family. And hopefully, my ball will stay out of the pool.

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

 

Golfing with Family

Golfing with Family

The Water

The Water

Ruth Lake CC - A place for family

Ruth Lake CC – A place for family

Golfing and Football?

Golfing and Football?

Amy and the 18th at Ruth Lake CC

Amy and the 18th at Ruth Lake CC

Parked on the Benches – A Futuristic look at the Village of Clarendon Hills – “Talk of the Town”


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier May 14, 2015

Parked on the Benches

The headline read, “Town recognized as most welcoming community in the country.” How did they do it? What was the key that unlocked their success?

It all started five years ago, when an initiative put forth by a few civic-minded people in Clarendon Hills changed the course of history for their small town. These local folks decided to implement an idea … a creative concept that would eventually transform a normal suburban town into what is known all over the world today as “The Welcoming Village.”

It was a simple idea, but it caught on like wildfire. Today, when you drive around this small town, you’ll notice that almost every block has something that’s unique to this particular place: benches in the front yards. Set just off the sidewalk, these attractive benches make a simple statement to the passers-by and neighbors: they are welcome to sit, relax and enjoy a conversation.

Something special happened after the benches started popping up. While it was hard to define, it was easy to recognize. Soon after the benches appeared, you could see a change in the attitudes and pace of the day around town. People began to slow down and take time to get to know each other, and many even started introducing themselves to strangers.

As familiarity for the phenomenon grew, the entire village seemed to join in. The result was similar to the community trends you see in some other towns: in some places, when the light is on, for instance, people know to stop over. And in some neighborhoods, people bring their lawn chairs over when the garage door is up.

Here in Clarendon Hills, the organizers of this initiative offered a plan to keep the project simple, keeping the benches looking similar enough that they contributed to the overall welcoming brand. After all, any valuable brand demands conformity. Thus, three different styles of benches were offered, as well as three hardscape options: bricks, stone and mulch.

In the first month of that very first summer, 20 houses on the south side of the tracks got their benches installed. The second month saw another 20 installed on the north side. The next summer, 80 were installed around town. The benches became a sort of a status symbol to homeowners who wanted theirs to be one of the welcoming homes. And as you know, the rest is history.

Of course, as you may have guessed by now, this history is one that’s entirely made up.

Sadly, this isn’t a story of Clarendon Hills’ past, but rather a fictional story set in the future. Is it made up? Sure … but something like this could come true, right?

Today, Clarendon Hills is known as a town of volunteers. But perhaps it’s time for a rebranding! How about “The Welcoming Village”? Who’s interested? All it would take is some civic-minded residents who wanted to step forward in service and start something great. And if there’s one thing I know about this town, it’s that we’re blessed to have plenty of those.

Are you one of them?

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

The Welcoming Village

The Welcoming Village – Photo by Cindy Kellogg

#ClarendonHillsRocks

The Art of Coaching “Talk of the Town”


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier April 30, 2015

 

It was fourth down and six, and the bigger, somewhat older (and probably illegal) team was pressing in. With the tension mounting, the long snapper over-snapped the punter and the ball bounced out of the end zone, giving the opponents two points — a safety.

The offensive players were in shock. This was the first time that they had been scored upon in the entire season. At halftime the score was 2-0, and the coach made a speech that no one on the team would ever forget.

The coach encouraged the players to figuratively tie themselves together in a knot so they could not be penetrated and scored on again. It was a motivating speech, but not just because of the metaphor. The players were motivated because the coach believed in them, and they believed in the coach — and each other. The team had a history and trust that was built on teamwork.

If you have ever coached, you know that it’s a tremendously rewarding job. Coaches get a front-row seat to watch their athletes compete and mature. They invest their time and resources into developing people and seeing them grow.

Of course, coaching is also a difficult job — especially when coaches are exposed to public scrutiny … and when their merit is judged by wins and losses.

What makes a good coach, anyway? Winning? Sure. If we’re talking about the Chicago Bears or the Vikings, it’s all about the Ws. But in our children’s world — be it little league, travel or high school — having an encouraging coach with a balanced perspective makes all the difference.

Everyone has seen a coach who just didn’t get it — one who used negative or discouraging comments to “motivate.” That might work with an adult athlete who becomes determined to prove his coach wrong, but it doesn’t work with younger athletes. Encouragement is the building block for confidence in young athletes.

Good coaches inspire their athletes to believe in themselves and to push to higher limits. They look kids in the eyes and get on their level while earning their respect. Good coaches take the time to explain and teach fundamentals while keeping the game fun. After all, aren’t sports and games supposed to be fun?

When I coach youth sports, I always adhere to three rules: fun, fun and fun. As the leader and chief architect of the kids’ experience, the coach should always make games and practices fun. One of a youth coach’s primary goals is to make the sport so attractive that the kids sign up again next year. They should try to take the stress out of the game by letting the kids play and not micromanaging their every move.

For some coaches, this is easier said than done. On every team there are different levels of maturity and skills, and it’s easy to get caught up in winning and playing the best kids.

Thankfully, most leagues have an equal playing time rule. But when there isn’t one, coaches should have a game plan for managing kids who are “daisy picking” and not engaged in the games. Should that plan involve mockery or aggressive chastising? Absolutely not. A coach should be overly encouraging to these kids, making them feel like part of the team. Some coaches have a negative tone and don’t encourage, instead constantly pointing out the errors. But those coaches entirely miss the point.

What are some other important parts of youth coaching? As crazy as it might sound, I could write an entire section on the snacks! I’ve seen kids crying at the end of a game as they watched the other team devouring their snacks while our kiddos looked for theirs in vain. And communication is also vital, as parents need consistent communication about schedules and events. That’s a matter of respect, and it goes a long way.

My father coached almost all of my sport teams when I was growing up. He and a few parents started a youth football league that began as a small operation with a few teams and a nicely groomed football field, but ended up as two separate locations with one field showcasing the travel teams at night under the lights.

I learned a lot of valuable lessons on that team — lessons from the coach that I never forgot. The last three years, we were undefeated. One year we were never scored on at all. And one year, we were scored on just once … two solitary points, given up in a safety.

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

#ClarendonHillsRocks

The very beginning of my understanding of sports - Colts Circa 1970

The very beginning of my understanding of sports – Colts Circa 1970

The "Good Game!" hand shake

The “Good Game!” hand shake

The almighty snack!

The almighty snack!

A Young Viking

A Young Viking!

The Minutemen - 2 points scored by KDI

The Minutemen – 2 points scored by KDI

My brother Chris 62 (the Long Snapper!).

My brother Chris 62 (the Long Snapper!).

You need to look the part

You need to look the part

Dad, always the coach

Dad, always the coach

The oldest and guinea pig

The oldest and guinea pig

Girls - The cheer!

Girls – The cheer!

 

Coach McCurry

Coach McCurry May 2015

 

Team McCurry

Team McCurry

 

An Election Poem – “Talk of the Town”


From Mike McCurry’s “Talk of the Town” column in The Clarendon Courier April 16, 2015

 

An Election Poem

Looking back on our town’s recent election,

I present this review (and some wry indiscretion).

 

There were candidates, a caucus, the park district too,

And poll-watchers who stuck to the judges like glue.

Candidates’ friends and families gave money and time,

While parents and children jammed in the yard signs.

 

There were too many signs at one business in town,

Which caused a big stink until they were torn down.

Thankfully, it worked out in a civil way,

With Starbucks coffee and level heads saving the day.

 

There were signs throughout town — some were red, white and blue,

And one with a picture just like you-know-who’s!

While some signs were allegedly stolen at night,

We’ll never really know; no one was caught onsite.

 

There were “My” and “Voice of” and “Saving” and “C4,”

And those robocalls! (Stop! We can’t take any more!)

Accusations about prostitutes; hacked email treasures;

And a store’s rumored name-changing to “Divine Pleasures.”

But the volunteer townspeople didn’t get alarmed;

They maintained our friendly village’s small-town charm.

 

The Hinsdalean and Courier held candidate nights,

Giving even the veterans sweaty palms and frights.

They sure helped the public to forge an opinion;

While the blogs fought to maintain internet dominion.

 

The newspapers helped out in stirring the pot,

And political ads also thickened the plot!

There were days when the voting junk mail hit high gear,

And I laughed when that tall building pasted together did reappear,

“The town is going to the birds,” I’m sure it did say…

If I didn’t vote rightly, they would have their way.

 

There were three CH residents running for the school board:

An incumbent, a blogger, and a mother of four.

That last one sure seemed like a good bet to me;

She’s a smart former teacher, (and her name’s McCurry!)

 

Guess they ran out of reasons not to re-elect Marty;

Though they tried to evict him, he stayed at the party.

 

The high school candidates had the most signs on the streets;

There was no way this year that they would take defeat.

There was contentious battling to even the score,

But the voters spoke loudly. Their votes cried, “No More!”

 

The election is over. Enough is enough.

Let’s forget the campaigning and accomplish some stuff!

No more knocking on doors, no more emails or calling.

No more train station loitering, hand-shaking or groveling.

 

The votes are all counted. I’ve run out of rhymes.

Good luck to the candidates … this is your time!

 

Mike is a Clarendon Hills resident; husband; Indian Princes; Indian Guide Dad;  a Coach; an “old” football player and a real estate broker.  Mike’s columns are usually crafted about the buzz in and around the area.  It sometimes has a spin on real estate or cultural information, highlight a new business or announce school happenings.  He might include a “get-to-know” about some of our interesting residents and even a little about history. Whatever it is, it is sure to be about the “Talk of the Town”. Mike McCurry has been selling real estate in the western suburbs for over 25 years and his office is located at 5 S. Prospect Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 His blog can be found at mikemccurryhomesblog.wordpress.com 630-325-2800 or visit his website at www.mmccurry.com

#ClarendonHillsRocks

Below are some of the images (many are hilarious!) from the recent election that took place on April 7, 2015

Many got taken down and the three remained

Many got taken down and the three remained

Saving Clarendon Hills...Amazing Grace Bookstore?

Saving Clarendon Hills

Saving Clarendon Hills...Amazing Grace Bookstore?

Saving Clarendon Hills

This was really sent out but it's still hard to believe!  Says: "champion of illegal aliens, prostitutes and convicted felons". I guess you can say anything you want in an election!  Wow!!

This was really sent out but it’s still hard to believe! Says: “champion of illegal aliens, prostitutes and convicted felons”. I guess you can say anything you want in an election! Wow!!

Saving Clarendon Hills...Amazing Grace Bookstore?

"Condo Hills"

“Condo Hills”

The C4CH sample ballot without the write in or D181

The C4CH sample ballot without the write in or D181

A column explaining why the "Hold D181 Accountable" Blog is good

A column explaining why the “Hold D181 Accountable” Blog is good

Hinsdalean endorses the candidates!

Hinsdalean endorses the candidates!

 

"Though they tried to evict him, he stayed at the party." Interesting that someone was called out as not being a team player but they made a sign without Marty's name on it.

“Though they tried to evict him, he stayed at the party.” Interesting that someone was called out as not being a team player but they made a sign without Marty’s name on it.

 

Some nice children jamming  in a sign

Some nice children jamming in a sign

And one with a picture (with a sign) just like you-know-who’s!

And one with a picture (with a sign) just like you-know-who’s!

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